Upcoming Events and Meetings

The Boy Scout Program

Boys may join Boy Scouts of America as a continuation of their boy scout trail from cub scouts - this is where the majority of boy scouts come from. But, the age of 11 is a great time for a youth to begin scouting! The Boy Scout program is a big change from cub scouting, the biggest change being that it is scout-led instead of adult-led. If you have youth crossing over from Webelos and joining a boy scout troop, challenge them to invite at least one non-scouting friend to join them. Since 3/4 of Scouting is 'outing', youth that didn't care for the crafts and projects of cub scouts may be interested in camping, hiking, and the outdoors that Boy Scouts offers.

Meeting Notes from Most Recent Monday Scout Meeting:

  • VFW Service Project - BBQ Cook-off this coming Saturday, 10/06 at 9:00 am
  • We will be helping with some setup, parking and recruiting judges for the cook-off. As always, full Class A. We will probably work for a couple hours, then you are welcome to just stay and enjoy the event.

Event Types

  • Troop Meeting - Weekly(ish) meetings with activities to help scouts advance and grow into future leaders.
  • PLC - The patrol leaders’ council (PLC) is made up of the senior patrol leader, who presides over the meetings; the assistant senior patrol leader, all patrol leaders, and the troop guide. The patrol leaders’ council plans the yearly troop program at the annual troop program planning conference. It then meets monthly to fine-tune the plans for the upcoming month.
  • Committee Meeting - The Adult Leaders (Scouters) primary responsibility is supporting troop leaders in delivering quality program and handling troop administration. The troop committee is responsible for conducting the business of the troop, setting policy, and helping the Scoutmaster and Scouts with the outdoor program and other planned activities.
  • Shakedown - This event is used to prepare for an upcoming campout, summer/winter camp, or high adventure excursion. The goal is plan, gather equipment, and otherwise prepare for the upcoming event.
  • ILST - Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops (ILST) is a unit-level training program within the Boy Scouts of America led by the Scoutmaster and the Senior Patrol Leader. It is designed to improve the leadership skill of all boy leaders within a Boy Scout troop.

MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law.

Scout Oath

On my honor I will do my best

To do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law;

To help other people at all times;

To keep myself physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight.

Scout Law

A Scout is:

Trustworthy

Loyal

Helpful

Friendly

Courteous

Kind

Obedient

Cheerful

Thrifty

Brave

Clean

Reverent

VISION STATEMENT

The Boy Scouts of America will prepare every eligible youth in America to become a responsible, participating citizen and leader who is guided by the Scout Oath and Law.

THE AIMS AND METHODS OF SCOUTING

The Scouting program has specific objectives, commonly referred to as the “Aims of Scouting.” They are character development, leadership development, citizenship training, and personal fitness. Leadership development is also one of Scoutings eight methods contributing to both good character and good citizenship.

The methods by which the aims are achieved are listed below in random order to emphasize the equal importance of each.

Ideals – The ideals of Scouting are spelled out in the Scout Oath, the Scout Law, the Scout motto, and the Scout slogan. The Scout measures themselves against these ideals and continually tries to improve. The goals are high, and, as they reach for them, they have some control over what and who they become.

Patrols – The patrol method gives Scouts an experience in group living and participating citizenship. It places responsibility on young shoulders and teaches Scouts how to accept it. The patrol method allows Scouts to interact in small groups where they can easily relate to each other. These small groups determine troop activities through their elected representatives.

Outdoor Programs – Scouting is designed to take place outdoors. It is in the outdoor setting that Scouts share responsibilities and learn to live with one another. It is here that the skills and activities practiced at troop meetings come alive with purpose. Being close to nature helps Scouts gain an appreciation for God’s handiwork and humankind’s place in it. The outdoors is the laboratory for Scouts to learn ecology and practice conservation of nature’s resources.

Advancement – Scouting provides a series of surmountable obstacles and steps in overcoming them through the advancement method. The Scout plans their advancement and progresses at their own pace as they meet each challenge. The Scout is rewarded for each achievement, which helps them gain self-confidence. The steps in the advancement system help a Scout grow in self-reliance and in the ability to help others.

Association with Adults – Scouts learn a great deal by watching how adults conduct themselves. Scout leaders can be positive role models for the members of their troops. In many cases a Scoutmaster who is willing to listen to the Scouts, encourage them, and take a sincere interest in them can make a profound difference in their lives.

Personal Growth – As Scouts plan their activities and progress toward their goals, they experience personal growth. The Good Turn concept is a major part of the personal growth method of Scouting. Young people grow as they participate in community service projects and do Good Turns for others. Probably no device is so successful in developing a basis for personal growth as the daily Good Turn. The religious emblems program also is a large part of the personal growth method. Frequent personal conferences with their Scoutmaster help each Scout to determine their growth toward Scouting’s aims.

Leadership Development – The Scouting program encourages Scouts to learn and practice leadership skills. Every Scout has the opportunity to participate in both shared and total leadership situations. Understanding the concepts of leadership and becoming a servant leader helps a Scout accept the leadership role of others and guides them towards participating citizenship and character development.

Uniform – The uniform makes the Scout troop visible as a force for good and creates a positive youth image in the community. Scouting is an action program, and wearing the uniform is an action that shows each Scout’s commitment to the aims and purposes of Scouting. The uniform gives the Scout identity in a world brotherhood of youth who believe in the same ideals. The uniform is practical attire for Scout activities and provides a way for Scouts to wear the badges that show what they have accomplished.